Tag Archive for 'renewable energy'

Extremely constructive talks on modern energy storage project

Leading energy storage project discussed between Cllr Enright, Environmental minister Durkan and leaders of the Ulster Farmers union and DDFFRE.

Leading energy storage project discussed between Cllr Enright, Environmental minister Durkan and leaders of the Ulster Farmers union and DDFFRE.

 

Ground-breaking energy storage project discussed in extremely productive talks with Environmental minister Durkan. Councillor Enright led a delegation of leaders of the Ulster Farmers union and local Down farmers organisation DDFFRE. The scheme would be the first of its type in the UK and Ireland and is slated to be based at the old airdrome in Ballyhornan and serving Ardglass and other Lecale villages with renewable energy.

Minister promised to make an on-site tour in July

Grant given to local Energy storage scheme

DDFFRE and David Surplus from B9 meet with Cllr Cadogan Enright over a new energy storage project fund worth up to a possible £450,000 for the Lecale area.

DDFFRE and David Surplus from B9 meet with Cllr Cadogan Enright over a new energy storage project fund worth up to a possible £450,000 for the Lecale area.

Councillor Enright organised a joint funding application between energy company B9 representative David Surplus and the local farmers co-operative Down District Farmers for renewable energy. The grant is aimed at creating a ‘micro-grid’ in the Lecale area which will enable farmers to connect to the national grid without the massive charges they currently face of up to £450,000 for a connection. This will make the Lecale area the first project of its kind in Britain and Ireland.

MEETING ENVIRONMENT MINISTER ON GLOBAL WARMING WITH FARMERS REPRESENTATIVES

Local farmers group ‘Down District Farmers for Renewable Energy’ (DDFFRE) met with Department of the Environment Minister Mark H  Durkan on Monday afternoon to seek his support for the Lecale area being recognized as the UK reference site for energy storage and micro-grid technologies. DDFFRE were supported by Ulster Farmers Union Gary Hawkes, UFU chief policy officer Chris Osborne, renewable energy companies and Down Councilor Cadogan Enright.

Some of the delegation to the Minister. Left to right, Cllr Cadogan Enright with Ulster Farmers Union Chief Policy Officer Chris Osbourne and Down District Farmers representatives Declan Owens and Alan Montgomery

Some of the delegation to the Minister. Left to right, Cllr Cadogan Enright with Ulster Farmers Union Chief Policy Officer Chris Osbourne and Down District Farmers representatives Declan Owens and Alan Montgomery

Delegation leader Cllr Enright said “An extremely constructive meeting addressed the Northern Irelands Regional Development Policy and perceived gaps in how this was translated in the down and Ards Area Plan. There was a concern that Northern Ireland could lose the opportunity to become the UK lead in these new technology areas if planning policy did not reflect national policy. We noted how the Scottish Government had succeeded in gaining the UK reference site for wave and tidal energy.” CLICK FOR DETAILS OF EXCITING LOCAL PROJECT HERE 

DDFFRE Chairperson Alan Montgomery said, “Many will remember how the existing Area Plan was published years late with significant gaps. In particular, it is clear that current regional commitments to tackling Global Warming and moving energy policy towards renewable energy were not reflected in the old Area Plan as these subjects were not on the agenda when it was formulated. This has a serious impact on the way planners make decisions and could affect our pilot project. Planner are only required to deal with matters referred to in policy.”

Gary Hawkes, Ulster Farmers Union rural enterprise chairman said, “With ongoing capacity problems continuing to affect grid connection for small scale renewables in Northern Ireland, the UFU believe that this micro-grid solution is an alternative way forward.  If the go ahead is granted, this pilot could be spread out to other rural parts of the country and allow farmers to create community energy networks for their local areas, with much needed storage and distribution solutions. However planning policy must follow regional policy if this is to happen.”

Minister Durkan undertook to arrange follow-up meetings with the Northern Irish Environment Agency, to see how Regional Development Policy could be translated more effectively in Area Planning. He undertook to see how his department could assist Rural Development initiatives around micro-grids and energy storage and how they could support the Invest NI-backed Lecale micro-grid pilot project based in the Bishopscourt and Ardglass areas of County Down.

News article

WHY WAS MY LAST POST ON THIS PAGE IMPORTANT TO YOU? HOW WILL GLOBAL WARMING AFFECT US HERE?

Globalwarming lecale This NASA diagram shows the effect in Down District if the Greenland Ice Sheet melts and the West Antarctic Ice sheet enters the sea. We become a group of islands and the Ards peninsula starts to disappear under water.

See my website and try other scenarios for yourself www.enright.ie/maps . In April 2013 the level of carbon dioxide in the air went above 400 parts per million for the first time since before humans evolved on the planet. This will have an effect if not stopped.

Aside from impact on the human population, Cambridge scientists predict that over 50% of bird species worldwide will become extinct from global warming with similar impacts on most other life forms.

4th Dec Massive Green Energy Project Could Make Lecale an Energy Leader

dec 4 2013 Cllr Cadogan Enright chairs massive investment initaitive in Ardglass Ballyhornan AreasArdglass and Ballyhornan look set to gain big-time here.
This will have benefits to the whole Downpatrick and Lecale area
This is one of my most successful campaigns to date – it looks like its going to Translate into jobs, lower cost energy and more sustainable family farms in Lecale

SEE LINK TO FULL STORY HERE

POOREST IN SOCIETY EXCLUDED FROM FUEL POVERTY IMPROVEMENTS

HERE IS A LETTER I WROTE TO THE MINISTER DRAWING ATTENTION TO UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF ENERGY AND FUEL POVERTY PROGRAMES THAT DISCRIMINATE AGAINST THE POOREST IN SOCIETY

Dear Minister McCausland,

I am a Cllr in Down, so I am copying my local MLA Jim Wells on this issue.

I am writing to alert you to two policy issues involving your department (one of which also affects Minister Arlene Foster as well) that are affecting poor and elderly people across NI that I have been unable to resolve via your civil servants, as they can only implement the existing schemes as is, and are not empowered to address flaws in the schemes.

I have put full details below ,including links to your departments websites, to ensure it is easy for you to validate what I have written. But the two problems are in summary

1. Your excellent warm homes scheme provides those on very low incomes living in uninsulated houses to have internal insulation installed. Unfortunately the scheme cannot help the 1/2% of homes in NI that are single-wall stone-built houses. These are the coldest houses and are most likely to be lived in by those suffering from fuel poverty.

Internal insulation is not suitable for these houses, as it will bring the ‘dew point’ within the structure and create extensive damp problems within the home. Only external insulation can assist in this problem.

Elsewhere in the UK, the Warm Homes Surveyors are empowered in these circumstances to recommend that external insulation is used. I feel that it is essential that this flexibility also be shown in NI. NOTE ALSO that there are cost  savings with external insulation arising from the fact that redecoration of the house is unnecessary and that the residents do not have to  be moved out while it is going on. Equally importantly, is the fact that external insulation does not reduce the size of the home and thus preserves value – as many of these properties are public sector assets. Finally external insulation does not leave ‘cold-spots’ where condensation can be a problem, as there are areas of every house that cannot be internally insulated.

I have brought this matter to the attention of the Housing Executive during 2010 and 2011 but understand no action has been taken to change policy as of this date, and no change is planned.

2. The second problem concerns your excellent boiler replacement scheme. I am a strong supporter of your Boiler Replacement Scheme for several reasons ;

1.      It allows people on low and very low incomes to replace outmoded inefficient boilers with grants of up to £1000 to switch to modern, efficient, money-saving alternatives, helping to lift people out of fuel poverty.

2.          It allows the Executive to seed the movement from wide-spread over-dependence on fuel oil for home heating towards gas, and even to renewable energy in the form of wood-pellet boilers – an area in which our home-grown industry excels in terms of production and supply. Section 12 of the application form provides a range of sensible alternatives for the applicant to choose from.

3.        Applicants for the scheme in the Greater Belfast area are also able to avail of grants from Firmus and Pheonix, in addition to your grant, to smooth their transition from oil to gas, this is likely to cover most of not all of the cost for switching to gas.

4.         The generous grant for replacement oil-fired boilers is likely to cover the majority of the cost of a replacement oil-fired system.

As I pointed out, applicants in the Greater Belfast Area can apply for an additional grant if they are switching to gas. This is explicitly permitted in section 9 of your NIHE boiler grant  application form.

Unfortunately, because of the way section 9 is worded, applicants are (probably unintentionally) not permitted to apply for the £2,500 Renewable Heat Premium Payment Scheme (RHPPS) in respect of Wood Pellet boilers, which will make this option unaffordable for most of your applicants.

This has a number of unintended consequences;

a)    Replacement oil and gas boilers can be installed for approximately the same cost as the grant. Wood Pellet Boilers cost at least £4000, leaving a £3000 shortfall which low-income families will be unlikely to be able to find.

b)        The (presumably) accidental prohibition on applying for the RHPPS means that only well-off families will be able to apply for the £2,500 grant available to replace oil-fired boilers with renewable alternatives.

c)      Thus your scheme accidently rules out poorer people from accessing lower-cost locally produced fuel

d)      It also creates a disparity between those in the Greater Belfast Area who are able to opt for (usually) lower cost gas, and the bulk of the population around the province who are not able to opt for a lower-cost fuel.

e)      Finally, and most importantly, the current format of your application from rules your applicants out from applying for the 20-year Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI)  that they would have qualified for had they been able to apply for the RHPPS. The RHI will be payable from this or next year, and while the value in NI has not yet been agreed, it was agreed in England and Wales at £950 per annum for 20 years. It is clear that the RHI has the ability to lift the worst off families in the North completely out of fuel poverty.

I am sure that you will see that the probably unintentional barring of applicants to the NI Boiler Replacement Scheme from also applying for the RHPPS has very severe consequences.

The obvious remedy is to allow in section 9 for applicants to apply for the RHPPS in the same manner in which they can apply for the Phoenix and Firmus Grants.

I trust yourself and Jim Wells can look into these two issues, and issue a Ministerial direction accordingly as neither issue would result in any budgetary variance, but simply empower those running existing scemes to do so more effectively.

Cllr Cadogan Enright

07590462329

1. contacts for the Housing Executive boiler replacement scheme in this area is   http://www.nidirect.gov.uk/grant-to-replace-your-boiler 028 9182 9761 * myra.forsythe@nihe.gov.uk

2. Grant details for the Renewable scheme is as follows;

Northern Ireland Renewable Heat Premium Payment Scheme

Technology

Support per unit (£) in a dwelling

Air Source Heat Pump 1700
Biomass boiler 2500
Ground Source or Water Source Heat Pump 3500
Solar Thermal 320

NEWS: http://www.northernireland.gov.uk/news-deti-240512-foster-launches-northern

FAQ: http://www.detini.gov.uk/fffaaaqqqq.pdf

DETAILS: http://www.detini.gov.uk/deti-energy-index/northern_ireland_renewable_heat_premium_payment_scheme_.htm

TERMS: http://www.detini.gov.uk/tandc1.pdf

FACT SHEET: http://www.detini.gov.uk/info_gpdf.pdf

APPLICATION: http://www.detini.gov.uk/app1.pdf

Jan 20th 2013 PV panels

Cllr Cadogan Enright writes to regulator to say that regulation of PV panel installations is unnecessarily complex and adds bureaucratic and technical costs to renewable energy.

A ‘Net Metering’ policy would be far preferable to most consumers, and would be much simpler to administer

Lecale Farmers meet UUP’s John McCallister 16 Jan uary 2013

Lecale Farmers meet UUP’s John McCallister 16 Jan uary 2013

Down Council wastes financial opportunity with renewable energy at Drumnakelly – 5th Dec 2012

Down Council wastes financial opportunity with renewable energy at Drumnakelly – 5th Dec 2012

Minister supports Farmers on Wind Turbines Oct 2012

Minister for Environment backs Lecale Farmers wind turbine campaign

Picture shows DDFFRE (Down District Farmers For Renewable Energy) at their inaugral meeting in Denvirs Hotel organised by Cllr Cadogan Enright

DOWN FARMERS AFFECTED BY MECURIAL PLANNING DECISIONS ON RENEWABLE ENERGY

Attached is a photograph of Cllr Cadogan Enright (right), Ulster Farmers Union representative Elliot Bell and Paddy Flynn with some of the many local farmers attending the meeting on Wednesday 6th June 2012 in Down District Council

Attached is a photograph of Cllr Cadogan Enright (right), Ulster Farmers Union representative Elliot Bell and Paddy Flynn with some of the many local farmers attending the meeting on Wednesday 6th June 2012 in Down District Council

Councilor Cadogan Enright organized a meeting of farmers from the Down area with the Ulster Farmers Union following a series of planning decisions which he has described as ‘mercurial’.

Cllr Enright said, “Local farmers described situations in the hilly country around Drumsnade where a large wind-farm developer has been approved in principle for 5 wind turbines of 2.5 mega-watts each. But when the large developer withdrew, local farmers had problems getting permission for even 3 turbines less than one tenth that size. Individual applications by farmers are delayed locally for many years, whereas major developments are identified as ‘strategic’ and sail though the planning process at the highest levels.”

“This unequal treatment is unjust and creates a situation where the profits of renewable energy in Northern Ireland will be exported by big money interests, rather than kept in the hands of local people”, continued Cllr Enright.

Farmer and wind energy expert Paddy Flynn of Castlewellan said, “Planning policy seems to be interpreted one way in County Down, and another way across N.I.. This does not help people like myself working to advance renewable energy in the rural economy”.

Ulster Farmers Union representative Elliot Bell was extensively briefed at the meeting on 10 different planning issues, with farmers present to back up their complaints with detailed examples. Elliot confirmed that UFU would be seeking to speak with senior planners about the interpretation of policy in Down.

“One of the biggest issues is that planners are reluctant to meet with farmers planning renewable energy installations in N.I. prior to planning being submitted. This creates a lose-lose situation where expensive planning applications have to be speculatively submitted to get attention of planners. In Scotland or England and Wales it is possible to get an on-site planning application quite rapidly prior to any application being made to ensure compliance with local policies. This avoids time and money being wasted. Planners in Rathkelter House had promised to resolve this situation as far back as May 2010, but have failed to do so”, Concluded Cllr Enright