Tag Archive for 'roads service'

3rd April 2013 Dispute with Roads Service hits front page 1

Cllr Cadogan Enright highlights statement by Roads Service that Downpatrick does not have a congestion problem
3rd April 2013 Dispute with Roads Service hits front page 1 by CadoganEnright
SECOND MORE DETAILED PAGE OF COVERAGE
Dispute with Roads Service hits front page 2 - "NO CONGESTION IN DOWNPATRICK SAYS ROADS SERVICE" !!!

Dispute with Roads Service hits front page 2 – “NO CONGESTION IN DOWNPATRICK SAYS ROADS SERVICE” !!!

3rd April 2013 Dispute with Roads Service hits front page 1, a photo by CadoganEnright on Flickr.

Road Service denies that Downpatrick has a congestion problem

TACKLING ROADS SERVICE EXCUSES IN DOWN DISTRICT

LETTER TO THE EDITOR OF DOWN RECORDER RESPONDING TO ARTICLE BY ROADS SERVICE CHIEF

Sir, 

Firstly can I welcome Divisional Roads Manager’s statement regarding plans to tackle traffic management in Downpatrick. I am also pleased that Roads Service will shortly be receiving a comprehensive study to identify and assess potential measures to improve traffic and pedestrian movements at a number of junctions in Downpatrick.  We will be able to add this to the  long line of similar traffic studies which have generated little response from Roads Service in terms of projects on the ground.

The analysis of the congestion problem by Kevin Monaghan in Downpatrick is helpful however, even if it is again lacking in detail.  Mr Monaghan lists some of the schemes and some elements of progress.  But two key issues remain for me as a public representative.

Firstly, the unbalanced consultation into the one-way system at Edward Street continues to be of concern.  Mr Monaghan’s assertion that this is how such consultations are conducted is at variance with best practice in the public service. He admits that the overriding factor for Roads Service was the displacement of 3,000 vehicles from the Edward St area. Why then did Roads Service inform Council that they would use the resurfacing of Edward Street as a test of a one-way system?, and why did they feel a consultation exercise of any sort needed to be undertaken?

Secondly and more significantly, Council is still awaiting detailed responses to a series of questions put to Roads Service at a formal meeting over 7 months ago.

At Council meeting on 22 October 2012 members posed a series of questions to Roads service officials regarding the inadequacy of Road Service’s response to congestion problems in Down District, and Downpatrick in particular.  Questions were also raised about the inadequacy of the Capital Programme for the District. These questions are shown below.  The public statement by Divisional Manager makes no reference either the outstanding questions, or to timetables for each scheme or the likely benefits in terms of traffic flows.

Council Meeting 22nd October 2012 – Questions put to Roads Service Officials

1.    Can you confirm the capital programme for Downpatrick/District and provide  background papers including indicative or detailed costs, Appraisal Summary Tables and supporting documents for all such schemes?

2.    When will construction work start on the A24 Ballynahinch  by-pass scheme?

3.    What is the agreed timetable from Roads Service for each identified improvement  scheme or initiative for Downpatrick,  including those to alleviate traffic congestion?

4.    What improvement in traffic flows for Downpatrick will be generated by these schemes, singly and collectively?

5.    Can Roads Service provide details of all roads schemes considered in last 5 years for Downpatrick in addition to agreed and programmed schemes?

6.    How much additional funding does Downpatrick attract from DRD in recognition of its location on Regional Strategic Transport Network?

 

Council has sought to pursue this information by a series of letters and FoI requests to local Roads service officials, TransportNi, the Permanent Secretary of DRD and the Minister himself.

All responses have been lacking the required detail, despite Roads Service claims that they have supplied answers to what they were asked. Their repeated message is that Downpatrick is no more congested than other Northern Ireland towns. As a consequence Roads Service will continue to deploy inadequate capital investment in the District. Towns like Comber now have two by-passes whereas even the most basic junction upgrades promised years ago in Downpatrick are still not delivered.

Based on their responses to FoI requests, it would appear that they have actually no detailed work done on these projects on most of their project files.

It is clear Roads Service is intent on avoiding answering these questions fully.  Council and local people have a right to know how far each identified scheme has progressed, what stages have been reached in realising each project and what further work is needed by Roads service to make these schemes ready to be implemented.

Council, and I as a public representative, will continue on behalf of the ratepayers who fund the Roads Service, to press for answers and to make available all requested information.

Cllr Cadogan Enright

07590462329

PS I attach a list of in projects in Downpatrick and Down District, featuring the information so far supplied by the Roads Service, in the format used by the Roads Service themselves – you will note that most information boxes are blank.

You might enquire of Roads Service as to why they are unable to fill the blanks

Have a look for yourself at the Roads Service Capital Programme for Down District INCLUDING BLANKS

APRIL 2013 Letter to the Editor on Roads SDLP letting Downpatrick down

Sir,

I am greatly disappointed that an SDLP councillor has broken ranks with the cross-party Roads Task Force so early in the process of trying to ease congestion and facilitate jobs growth in the Downpatrick area. We cannot afford to replace practical plans to resolve these problems with vague platitudes and exhortations.

If Cllr Sharvin does not agree his fellow councillors advancing the conclusions of all the professional studies and plans commissioned to deal with these problems, he must at least advance alternatives to solving the congestion problem. Given the lack of Roads Service support for the town, any divisions on our own plans could be fatal.

The context of what we are trying to do is clear. Under the Ards Down Area plan 2015 Downpatrick is designated as a key sub-regional centre with the aspiration to support a critical mass of population of up to 25,000. But we are constrained by our roads system.

  • The road networks in the town centre converge at the constrained Arts Centre junction of Market Street, Irish Street, Scotch Street, English Street and Church Street. Market Street, St Patricks Avenue and Irish Street function both the commercial centre of the town as well as local distributors for traffic to and from residential and commercial areas of Downpatrick.
  • The layout of the junction at Market Street/Irish Street makes the movements of large vehicles particularly challenging.
  • The A25 main through route includes Belfast Road, Church Street and Market Street. Links from Irish Street and Saint Patricks Avenue also act as distributor roads for a wide range of towns and villages to the South from Ballyhornan to Ardglass to Killough.
  • However the capacity of roads in the Town Centre has not changed since the days of the horse and cart.

Through and local traffic, parking, carrying HGV’s and Translink buses all have specific demands on the street and the combinations of demand contribute to congestion.

The Ards/Down Area Plan and the Masterplan envisages an Eastern Bypass to serve new industrial and employment centres to the South of the Town. The Department of Social Development’s Masterplan for Downpatrick also reflects this, along with a Southern Relief Road around the edge of Dunleath Park and ‘New Street’ to take through traffic away from the congested centre. These conclusions were also supported by JMP Consultants Transport Proposals Report for DSD June 2010 and the Ferguson and McIlveen Development Plan for Downpatrick 2006 commissioned by Council itself.

The recent transfer of the Council and other offices to the new Downshire Public Sector Campus on the Ardglass Road has further exacerbated the already congested nature of the town, particularly at peak times. Six improvements to junctions identified by Roads Service to Council over the last six years were to be in place to meet this major change in employment distribution in the town.

This situation has become so serious that late last year that myself and Cllrs Eamonn McConMidhe and Dermot Curran moved council to set up a cross-party ‘Roads Task Force’ to ensure that all political parties in the District combined their efforts jointly to focus on an agreed agenda for dealing with congestion and roads issues.

Roads Service has failed to advance any of the above.  Our Task Force has been endeavoring to elicit information on the status of these programs with a series of formal requests and FoI applications.

The land for Southern Relief Road from the Ardglass Road, around the back of the cinema and along the waste ground at the edge of Dunleath Park has the advantage of being owned and controlled by Council. Many studies have shown that when though traffic is removed from the congestion picture in any town, trading and commerce improves.

Given that our poor roads infrastructure has been used as a reason to prevent public sector jobs being located in the District, It behooves Cllr Sharvin to read the professional studies, and attend more of our meeting with the Roads Service to keep himself apprised of the realities on the ground.

 

Yours Etc

Cllr Cadogan Enright

075904623429

ROADS SERVICE SHOCK

A statement by Roger Morgan, Principal Engineer, at the Downpatrick Masterplan last week that there was no significant congestion problem in Downpatrick at the area Masterplan meeting has caused shock and concern to all the main players in planning the future of Downpatrick.

Chairing the Masterplan meeting, Cllr Cadogan Enright rejected the comments as ‘ludicrous’.  “Every study over the last ten years has highlighted the congestion issue. Council has been involved with a DSD led initiative involving all Government departments for several years to deliver on programmes identified in the Downpatrick Masterplan. I have attended these meetings along with previous Roads Service managers as part of the Masterplan Steering Group.  We have been attempting to deal with the constraints identified in the Masterplan – principally the accessibility of the town and surrounding areas for vehicular traffic serving both local residents and visitors to the town.”

Cllr Enright believes that the statement by the Principal Engineer may also explain why there has been a failure to advance previously identified schemes to deal with the congestion problem in Downpatrick by Roads Service.

Cllr Cadogan Enright pointed out that “studies confirm the inability of the roads infrastructure to support significant economic development or even serve the needs of the existing residents.”

“These studies include the JMP Consultants Transport Proposals Report for DSD June 2010 and the Ferguson and McIlveen Development Plan for Downpatrick 2006 commissioned by Council itself.  Roads Service has also carried out a number of studies under the auspices of the Sub-regional Transport Plan for the area. The Ards/Down Area Plan and the Masterplan envisages an Eastern Bypass to serve the industrial and employment centres to the South of the Town, This is reflected in the DSD Masterplan, along with a Southern Relief Road and ‘New Street’ to take through traffic away from the congested centre and set the foundations for a critical mass of population of up to 25,000.” Said Cllr Enright and he highlighted that in launching the Area plan in 2009 the then Minister Sammy Wilson stated,

“The plan also identifies the site for a new bypass for Ballynahinch and new distributor roads for both Newtownards and Downpatrick to alleviate traffic circulation issues in those towns”

Cllr Enright confirmed that he had referred this matter to his fellow councillors and Council was now seeking an urgent meeting with Mr Richard Pengelly, Permanent Secretary for the Department for Regional Development Northern Ireland.

“This represents an admission that Roads Service are not serious about tackling the congestion problem.  Clearly senior officials do not see the traffic situation in Downpatrick as a problem at all.  This may in part explain why Roads Service have failed to progress the many major and minor schemes which have been presented by Roads Service at their regular meetings with Down Council over the last 6 years.”  Concluded Cllr Cadogan Enright

Background

Downpatrick serves a large, mainly rural hinterland dependent on the private car for travel to access the town and beyond.

Under the Ards Down Area plan 2015 Downpatrick is designated as a key sub-regional centre with the aspiration to support a critical mass of population of up to 25,000.
· The main road network in the town centre converges at the constrained Arts Centre junction of Market Street, Irish Street, Scotch Street, English Street and Church Street. Market Street and Irish Street function as local distributors for traffic to and from residential and commercial areas of Downpatrick. They also act as routes for through traffic, in addition to their role as shopping streets.

· The layout of the junction at Market Street/Irish Street makes the movements of large vehicles particularly challenging.

· The main north-south route through Downpatrick includes Belfast Road, Church Street and Market Street. Commercial activity in the town centre is focused along Market Street and St Patrick’s Avenue, with some activities on parts of Irish Street. Irish Street and Killough Road link with Market Street at the Irish Street/Market Street junction.
In addition, there are a number of minor roads in the town centre which act as links between the main routes. Market Street and Irish Street, as a result, function as local traffic distributor roads, in addition to their role as shopping areas.

Through and local traffic, parking, carrying HGV’s and Translink buses all have specific demands on the street and the combinations of demand contribute to congestion.

The Ards/Down Area Plan and the Masterplan envisages an Eastern Bypass to serve the industrial and employment centres to the South of the Town, This is reflected in the DSD Masterplan, along with a Southern Relief Road around Dunleath Park and ‘New Street’ to take through traffic away from the congested centre and set the foundations for a critical mass of population of up to 25,000.

The recent transfer of the Council Offices to the new Downshire Public Sector Campus site has further exacerbated the already congested nature of the town particularly at peak times. Six improvements to junctions identified by Roads Service to Council over the last six years were to be in place to meet this major change in employment distribution in the town. Council has been endeavouring to elicit information on the status of these programs with a series of formal requests and FoI applications.

This situation has become so serious that late last year Cllrs Enright, McConMidhe and Curran moved council to set up a cross-party ‘Roads Task Force’ to ensure that all political parties in the District combined their efforts jointly to focus on an agreed agenda for dealing with congestion and roads issues.

Councillor Cadogan Enright
Down District Council
07590462329

ENRIGHT AND BURGESS SLAM DELAYS OVER EMERGENCY SERVICE ACCESS AS A THREAT TO HEALTH AND SAFETY

Councillors Cadogan Enright and Robert Burgess have hit out at long delays in replacing an incorrect lock on the Roads Service Car Park between Rathkeltair House and Down Railway, blocking access for emergency vehicles to the new greatly expanded working Rail Museum.

 

Councillors Enright and Burgess delays by Road Service as a threat to health and safety

Councillors Enright and Burgess delays by Road Service as a threat to health and safety

Cllr Enright explained “Early last year I complained to the Road Service that when one of the gates to the car park was damaged, it was left with an incorrect lock that did not facilitate access by the emergency services. In June of 2012 I complained again at the behest of the Councils legal officer and Roads Service apologised once more and said they would get a standard lock on the damaged gate as soon as possible.”

Councillor Burgess agreed and said “This has been going on now for over a year, action is past-due and its not for the want of us calling into Rathkeltair House, making phone calls and writing emails.”

Cllr Enright highlighted how recently deceased Down Rail Chairperson collapsed with a heart attack in the entrance to the railway last summer, “My wife Brenda did her best to make Michael comfortable while we waited for the ambulance which was not long in coming. The ambulance crew tried the standard key that is supposed to fit all these locks and could not get in. I ran from gate to gate with keys and a stepladder to try and let the ambulance in to no avail. The emergency services were upset that the key would not fit all gates and this caused a delay in the rescue.”

Robert Burgess commented “You would think that this incident would have created a sense of urgency in the Road Service, but not at all – here we are in March 2013 and the gate is being repaired – Lord knows if we will get the right emergency services key or not. There have been similar long delays in dealing with our request to Roads Service to improve signage to the railway for Tourists – we will be watching carefully to see how this ends up”.

Both Councillors help out at the railway on a volunteer basis for what is rapidly becoming one of County Downs premier tourist attractions. They invited people of all ages to volunteer – saying that there are a wide range of skills required from manual labour, operating heavy machinery, carpentry, engineering, administration, on the internet and in the museums and shop. There are 13 different teams of people working away throughout the week, and there were roles for people of every age and ability. See www.downrail.co.uk/join.htm

Councillor Cadogan Enright moves to take Roads Service to Civil Service Ombudsman

CLICK HERE TO SEE Roads Service one-sided consultation MS/4839 To; Dr A McC Murray  Chief Executive

Transportni Headquarters, Clarence Court, 10-18 Adelaide street, Belfast ,  20 May 2013, BT2 8GB

Dear Dr Murray,

I refer to your letter dated 3 May 2013 in response to Down District Council’s letter to Permanent Secretary regarding transport matters in Down District. Your response was circulated to Councillors for their information.

Council is giving consideration to the overall content of your letter along with a similar response from the Minister’s private Office however to draw a number of important matters to your attention.

In your response you state local officials gave very serious attention to a proposed one-way system for Edward Street in Downpatrick.  As you are aware Council objected strongly to the way in which the consultation on this scheme was organised in 2011. In particular officials were selective in compiling and assessing available evidence on supporters and objectors to the proposal.

A weighted question was posed to residents which only invited comments from those opposed to the introduction of the one-way system. This ignored the many residents, public representatives and road users likely to benefit from the proposal. That consultation is now being characterised retrospectively and disingenuously as an informal consultation.

I am unsure how this is meant to differ from a formal consultation except in that it fails to meet the standard of consultation normally required for such a significant proposal. Are officials empowered to substitute an informal arrangement for a formal consultation process?  If this is the case, which policy document contains this discretion?

Council would have concerns if TransportNI are seeking to rely on an inadequate consultation process given the impact on efforts to alleviate traffic congestion in Downpatrick town centre. I am also considering, in my private capacity raising this matter with Northern Ireland Ombudsman as an example of maladministration.

I must ask you therefore to properly investigate this matter. There was a clear and serious procedural failure in not conducting a proper and balanced consultation exercise on the proposal to introduce a one-way system in Edward Street Downpatrick. During the trial of the hugely successful trial of the one way system, I was one of 7 Councillors present at a meeting with the Roads Service in Down Council were we were told that no petitions or letters of support would be necessary given how overwhelmingly successful the one way system had been.

We voiced our concerns at the meeting, pointing out that sending a stamped addressed envelope seeking only negative responses to every house in the area was bound to elicit a few responses. Councillors pointed out how the local population, the local councillors, the MLAs and the MP we all delighted how the trial of the one way system had worked out.

We asked for the trial one-way system to be retained on a permanent basis, but Roads Service management insisted that the law required them to return to a two way system before running a consultation.

We queried this as a bit of a waste of money, but were told that was the law. We were told that we should not be concerned as the success of the one way system would make any consultation a formality.

I attach a copy of the consultation for your attention.

Should you fail to investigate this matter and uncover the fact that the consultation fell short of what is expected in the public service, I will have to take this matter forward to the Onbudsman under the heading of maladministration.

 

Yours sincerely,

Cllr Cadogan Enright

Downpatrick

07590462329

Road Service consultation on one way system deeply flawed 7th Nov 2012

Road Service Consultation on one way system deeply flawed 7th Nov 2012

NEW HOPE FOR ROADS AND JOBS IN COUNTY TOWN

Cllrs Curran and Enright at New Hospital

Cllrs Curran and Enright at New Hospital

Down Councillors Cadogan Enright and Dermot Curran have succeeded in establishing a cross-party sub-committee to campaign to retain and attract  public sector jobs in Downpatrick , and to address years of delays in resolving Roads congestion in the County Town including access to the new Downe  Hospital campus.

Cllr Enright said “At the Downpatrick/Lecale electoral area meeting last Thursday, we agreed to campaign on these key issues on a cross-party basis. Downpatrick is the only main hub within 20 miles of Belfast not to have benefited from significant investment to ease congestion, and the development of our ‘Public Sector Campus’ at the new Downe is being affected. The Downshire is unique amongst the 3 main hospitals in the South Eastern Trust area with an inadequate bus service.”

Cllr Curran said, “These issues are crucial to Downpatrick consolidating its role as a public sector jobs hub. At my last meeting as Council Chair in June, I put a motion on the need for the Chief Executive to develop a campaign to address the need to attract and protect public sector jobs following a series of negative announcements. I welcomed improving amendments from Cllr Enright at that time, and this cross-party proposal will give these campaigns teeth.”

Downpatrick area councillors committee chair Cllr Eamonn McConMidhe agreed and said “I welcome this proposal from Dermot and Cadogan. We are taking a similar approach here to our successful all-party Ballyhornan committee. The sub-committee will be empowered to invite our MP, our MLAs and all interested parties to play their role in the campaign as we have done for Ballyhornan. These issues are too important for party politics.”

Down Council Chief executive attended the meeting and supported the move. He has appointed senior council officer Gerry McBride to play the supporting and enabling role for these campaigns.

“The roads and public transport elements of this project are complex, involving the Roads Service, Translink, the Health Trust, emergency services and all the tenants at the new public sector campus at the Downeshire. Having a coordinated approach to public sector employment is no less complex. Since June, Council has sent Freedom of Information requests to all public sector bodies in NI questioning their approach to public sector employment in Down District over the last 5 years, and this is currently being complied to enable us to lobby effectively at Stormont up to and including the Office of the First and Deputy First Ministers.”, Concluded Councillor Enright.

link to newscutting

Are there any positives for 2013 from the dereliction spreading via empty Health Trust buildings across Downpatrick?

Cllr Cadogan Enright observing fires at Pound Lane from St Dillans Avenue October 2012

Cllr Cadogan Enright observing fires at Pound Lane from St Dillans Avenue October 2012

Enormous damage has been done to the centre of Downpatrick by poorly-planned management of valuable land and buildings across a whole swathe of the town by the SE Health Trust. As I live so close to the sites in question, I have had to call Downpatrick out the fire brigade on more than one occasion, and have also had to stand and watch while each building is burnt in turn. Community police claim they know who the culprits are, and that there are very few of them. However unless they are lifted and punished, it does very little good and only drags down the reputation of the whole area.

Aside from poor forward planning for the re-use of these buildings, they were secured in the most expensive manner using hoardings that would only keep law-abiding citizens, out and left without real security. Meanwhile organised theft on a massive scale of lead and other valuables from the old hospital has gone one and the whole area has now become a magnet for vandals for miles around. If the dereliction of protected Historic buildings had been allowed in the Private Sector, there would be accusations flying that it was deliberate  Sadly, this is an unlikely scenario here.

We have now reached such a state of dereliction  that it is very difficult to see why the South Eastern Trust cannot cooperate with the Road Service and Council and bring forward long-outstanding and oft reneged on comprehensive plans to finally implement a link road between the New Hospital cum Public Sector Campus and the Ballydugan Road. This would facilitate Down District being the HQ for the new Council and secure the future of the new Hospital by ensuring that it could not be said that access is impossible. Clearly this will still leave the question of how to access the Belfast Road from this site, but lets make a start where there are already pre-existing agreements in place to upgrade the key junctions down though the town.

Map of Public Sector Tenants at Downe

Map of Public Sector Tenants at Downe

Dick Shannon of the Down Community Health Committee has given me documents that show that the South Eastern Trust have reneged on commitments to pay the road service £450,000 towards the upgrading of roads and key junctions down though Downpatrick from the New Hospital and New Council down to the Bus Station on Market Street. These junctions include the Ardglass/Ballyhornan intersection, the Killough Road/Ballyhornan intersection, Collins’ Corner and the corner of St Patrick’s Avenue and Market Street. It is clear from these documents that £225,000 was to have been paid to the Road Service on the commencement of the Council Development, and another £225,000 was to have been paid on the commencement of the new Police Station at the Downe Public Sector Campus. Additionally the Council and the PSNI had to pay £200,000 each. The Council are working with the Road Service to advance plans ONLY with the PSNI and Council contribution. This issue is also about good asset management at the SE Health Trust, as if the Trust really wants its Public Sector Campus to be a huge success, then good roads and bus connections are a vital part of this picture.

Downpatrick Road Access to New Downe

Downpatrick Road Access to New Downe

If this was sorted out, then we could even propose that the Public Sector Campus at the Downe be extended to cover the whole area of dereliction from the Ardglass Road, across to Edward Street and down to Collins’s corner. This would turn a major liability for the SE Health Trust into a major asset. However there is little evidence on the ground that this sort of capability exists in the management of land banks. It is clear that the SE Health Trust has trouble coordinating the planning of its assets within the Trust area, let alone between the other Trusts within the HSC and the Public Sector in general. A case in point here is how Translink over the last 6 years have worked to try and persuade the group of public sector managers delivering the vision of the ‘Public Sector Campus’ to allow local bus services onto the site and develop ‘shuttle-bus’ concept down to Downpatrick bus station. Not only would this be consistent with government policy, but it would allow the Public Sector Campus to grow and prosper and let sick and elderly people more easily access the hospital and GP’s clinics. Translink has been repeatedly rebuffed.

There have been 2 bits of positive news between the end of 2012 and the start of 2013. Firstly the positive response by PSNI Commander Deirdre Bones to my request to allow Roads Service personnel to survey the derelict areas between Market Street and  the old PSNI station (see link). At the most recent meeting between the Road Service and Council they were able to tell us that they can now proceed with the survey needed for the new one-way system several years ahead of schedule without waiting for the PSNI to move out. This means that in the coming financial year we will get the cost of the project, and will be able to finally canvass Stormont to get funding. Downpatrick is the only urban centre within commuting distance of Belfast not to have congestion relief spending in the last 20 years.

Secondly I received support from Cllr Dermot Curran (see link) to create a cross-party group for Down council where all political parties in Down District will work to one agenda to break the log-jam on the Roads Congestion issue as well as work together to retain and secure public sector jobs for the County Town of Downpatrick and the District in general. This will operate like the Ballyhornan Taskforce, with a dedicated Council management resource driving it. I proposed to Council Chief Executive last year that we needed someone like Gerry McBride to front this, and it has come to pass with the support of all parties.

The dereliction of the centre, and the development of the new Down Leisure Centre might also create other opportunities of relieve congestion and link up all the vital services in the town in a coherent manner. The Cinema and the Council between them control all the land between the new link-road near Collins Corner and the Ballydugan Road near the ASDA shopping complex. Perhaps it is now time to look afresh at the concept of a road by-passing residential districts and the busy centre from the Hospital and Public Sector Campus, down to the Cinema, and on the boggy ground under Pemberton and the Vianstown Road down to a new roundabout at the outskirts of ASDA . If we don’t act now, future development will block all these opportunities.

As both myself and Cllr Dermot Curran are on the SE Health Trusts LCG, which looks at the commissioning of services in the SE Health Trust area, it is our intention to bring forward a presentation to our fellow LCG members, and try and persuade them that we should influence the Trust to see that that from a purely financial perspective, it would make enormous sense for the Trust to manage its assets in Downpatrick in a holistic manner, and try and see itself as a ‘Developer’, but in the business of making money for the taxpayer, as well as saving the Trust very large amounts of money in dealing with derelict property.

 

Failure of Road Service road delays damage new public sector campus and hospital access

Failures of Road Service damage new public sector campus and hospital access